About the project

Type of Build: Medium-Density Residential

Architect: Solari Architects

Complexity Level: High Level

You’d be forgiven for thinking that The District is a staple heritage piece of architecture in the well-established central Petone landscape. 

Location: Petone

Year: 2020

The District Project

New Iconic Heritage

Project Overview

Although the colossal red brick masterpiece, that adorns the corner of Jackson & Victoria Streets, is right on the edge of the Petone Heritage Zone, this New York Loft Style Apartment building is a new edition to ever-growing Petone cityscape.

 

The District is a Mixed-Use medium-density development comprising 44 Loft-Look Apartments and a commercial ground floor that fronts onto the bustling Jackson Street. 

 

Led by the Black Sheep Construction commercial team this complex build, designed by Solari Architects, took around 14-18 months to complete with a workforce of well over 40 builders & labourers - constructed primarily behind wrapped scaffolding to allow for work during any weather, and to protect the surrounding retail & residential districts.

 

While the structure was expertly crafted by FormCo, the Black Sheep Commercial Team project managed and completed this full-scale build, including managing multiple subcontractors, and various ongoing simultaneous onsite projects that were required to scale the building from the ground up. 

 

The District's name is derived and inspired by the Meatpackers District in New York City, and its style is heavily influenced by the well-recognized loft-style apartment living that is synonymous with the Big Apple. 

 

The Redbrick façade is in keeping with the existing heritage feel of the surrounding Petone neighbourhood, with the Umber Bricks especially sourced from Germany.

 

While the Jackson Street frontage is designed in line with the neighbouring properties and infrastructure, the Victoria Street siding follows through in the same theme with the addition of a more industrialised look including a sawtooth roof structure, again deriving from its New York City industrial design roots. 

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